Football Camp tests & now requires BRAIN-PAD protection

“In reviewing the data and product history over 15 years in a number of contact sports including Football, I have chosen the Brain Pad Jaw Joint Protector as the product I will require each participant at my Tackle Training Camps.”
-Bobby Hosea’s – Train ‘Em Up Academy
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Arena Football kicks-off its 2013 Pre-Season

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From the “Rage” – First preseason game and Blake Harris #38 dominated
the contest using Brain-Pad’s Dual-arch, PRO+ Jaw-Joint Protector™.

Blake-Harris-dual-arch-Brain-Pad01 In One and one-half quarters of play, Blake recorded 9 tackles (two for a loss), one QB knockdown which forced an interception, 1 pass deflection, 2 tackles on kickoff, and a huge pancake block on the Rage’s only kickoff return of the night.
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2011 Viano Study – Brand Name Guards Tested. RESULTS Published!

Viano’s 2011 Results Graph – Click to enlarge.
High Speed Impact Trials

New Head Form with Salient(moving) Lower Jaw & sensors to measure impact energy levels – Ground Breaking design !

LEFT = Bare Head Form.  RIGHT = Covered with imitation ‘skin’.

Results Graph – Click to enlarge.
Low Speed Impact Trials

Dual Arch Believer – Oscar De La Hoya !

Oscar has been protecting his career with Dual-Arch Protection.
Pictured below are a dual-arch custom dental appliance and what looks
to be Brain-Pad’s solid black PRO+ High Performance Jaw-Joint Protector™

 

 

I just received a penalty for not having a mouth guard. Why do I need to wear one?

The Hockey Doc: The importance of mouth guards By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I just received a penalty for not having a mouth guard. Why do I need to wear one?

Answer: I think you know part of the answer to this one already. While the obvious answer to using a mouth guard is that it protects your teeth from being chipped or knocked out, a mouth guard is also a very important safety device to prevent injuries.

The main purpose of a mouth guard is clear. It is there to protect your teeth from possible direct blows where they can either be chipped, significantly fractured, or knocked out. While serving a purpose in this regard, they also help to prevent some of the bad lip and cheek lacerations which can happen when a tooth is broken.

The other purpose of a mouth guard is to act as a shock absorber in your mouth. It serves as a spacer between the top and bottom row of your teeth and absorbs shock should you receive a blow to your jaw. You can imagine that if you have a significant blow to your chin that this force is going to go from your chin up through your jaw bone, into your teeth.  In this regard, a mouth guard helps to decrease jaw bone (mandible) fractures.

I hope this answers your question and that you choose to wear a mouth guard in all ice hockey related activities in the future. Wearing a mouth guard, and the rules which enforce it, are sort of like the rules for having seatbelts in cars. The mouth guard serves as a seatbelt to protect your teeth & jaw bone.

Robert F. LaPrade, M.D., Ph.D. is a complex knee surgeon at The Steadman Clinic in Vail, Colorado.  He is very active in research for the prevention and treatment of ice hockey injuries. Dr. LaPrade is also the Chief Medical Research Officer at the Steadman Philippon Research Institute. Formerly, he was the team physician for the University of Minnesota men’s hockey team and a professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the U of M. If you have a question for the Hockey Doc, e-mail it to editor @ letsplayhockey . comThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Last Updated on Thursday, 16 February 2012 10:25

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